Video – Boeing 777X First Flight incl. Wing Fold

The new Boeing 777X took off at Paine Field in Everett, Washington, for a three hour, 51 minute flight over Washington state before landing at Seattle’s Boeing Field.

Capt. Chaney and Boeing Chief Pilot Craig Bomben worked through a detailed test plan to exercise the airplane’s systems and structures while the test team in Seattle monitored the data in real time.

The first of four dedicated 777-9 flight test airplanes, WH001 will now undergo checks before resuming testing in the coming days. The test fleet, which began ground testing in Everett last year, will endure a comprehensive series of tests and conditions on the ground and in the air over the coming months to demonstrate the safety and reliability of the design.
The newest member of Boeing’s widebody family, the 777X will deliver 10 percent lower fuel use and emissions and 10 percent lower operating costs than the competition through advanced aerodynamics, the latest generation carbon-fiber composite wing and the most advanced commercial engine ever built, GE Aviation’s GE9X.
Passengers will enjoy a wide, spacious cabin, large overhead bins that close easily for convenient access to their belongings, larger windows for a view from every seat, better cabin altitude and humidity, less noise and a smoother ride.

The 777X has a new longer composite wing with folding wingtips. Based on the 787 wing but with less sweep, the new wing has a higher lift-to-drag ratio, an aspect ratio increased from 9:1 to 10:1, an area increased from 4,702 to 5,562 sq ft (436.8 to 516.7 m2), and usable fuel capacity increased from 320,863 to 350,410 lb (145,541 to 158,943 kg).
To stay within the size category of the current 777 with a less than 213 ft (65 m) wingspan, it features 11 feet (3.5 m) folding wingtips with the folding wingtip actuation system. The folding movement should be complete in 20 seconds and be locked in place at the end. Specific alerts and procedures are needed to handle a malfunction.
As existing regulations do not cover the folding wingtips, the FAA issued special conditions, including proving their load-carrying limits, demonstrating their handling qualities in a crosswind when raised, alerting the crew when they are not correctly positioned while the mechanism and controls will be further inspected.
The center wing-box is similar in size to the legacy 777 but is more reinforced and heavier, uising more titanium.

Boeing expects to deliver the first 777X in 2021. The program has won 340 orders and commitments from leading carriers around the world, including ANA, British Airways, Cathay Pacific Airways, Emirates, Etihad Airways, Lufthansa, Qatar Airways and Singapore Airlines. Since its launch in 2013, the 777X family has outsold the competition nearly 2 to 1.

The 777X includes the 777-8 and the 777-9, the newest members of Boeing’s market-leading widebody family.

Seat Count:
777-8: 384 passengers (typical 2-class)
777-9: 426 passengers

Engine:
GE9X, supplied by GE Aviation

Range:
777-8: 8,730 nautical miles (16,170 km)
777-9: 7,285 nautical miles (13,500 km)

Wingspan:
Extended: 235 ft, 5 in. (71.8 m)
On ground: 212 ft, 8 in (64.8 m)

Length:
777-8: 229 ft (69.8 m)
777-9: 251 ft, 9 in (76.7 m)

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